Slaving Away in Sochi

•December 21, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Andrea Rossini reports on preparations for the Winter Olympics in the Abkhazia capitol of Sochi in the Caucasus region, just north of the Georgian border on the Black Sea. While corruption by developers with IOC contracts is commonplace — no matter where the Olympics are held — the use of slave labor is hopefully less so. As Rossini notes, this is perhaps the first time the Winter Olympics has been held in a community that has no snow. Ruminating on why they are being held in a sub-tropical seaside resort, Rossini says local protestors call it a “private project of Putin and a few oligarchs.”

One candidate now running for mayor of Sochi says, “When Putin decided to enhance his international standing, he spent a few hours bent over a map of Russia, and ended up choosing the one place without snow.”

Abolishing Prostitution

•December 6, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Abolishing prostitution and associated violence against women is the goal of a law passed December 4 by the French Parliament. Attacking the system of prostitution as a violation of human rights, the new legislation supports prostituted persons and criminalizes procurement and trafficking of humans for prostitution. As the European Women’s Lobby reports, France now joins Sweden, Norway and Iceland with progressive policies to end male domination and violence against women.

Our colleagues at Prostitution Research and Education have more.

Uranium Film Festival

•November 27, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Watch some Uranium Film Festival 2013 trailers here.

Dogs on Drugs

•November 2, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Drug-sniffing dogs used by law enforcement are only accurate half the time, and with legalization of marijuana, they now have to be retrained. Some, I imagine, will have to take early retirement.


Big Capital Big Green

•October 24, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Macdonald Stainsby discusses Tar Sands NGOs, foundation funding and how Indigenous peoples resistance to destruction of their territories by oil and gas companies is usurped by lapdogs of corporate philanthropies like Tides Canada.

Value for Money

•August 17, 2013 • Leave a Comment

Tragic comedy best describes the political theatre of Pacific International Terminals and its hired guns for a coal export facility proposal in Washington state. Even before the environmental impact study has begun, the Gateway Pacific Terminal fiasco already comprises a three-act drama worthy of Shakespeare.

Caught in the act of illegally clearing a registered archaeological site containing an Indian village and burial ground in 2011, PIT in 2012 attempted to bribe the tribe with a multi-million dollar payoff in exchange for their treaty fishing rights and cultural heritage. When that failed, PIT hired the world’s largest public relations firm to stack the deck at public hearings on its slippery proposal by fiddling with the speaker allotment system. Recently exposed for publishing misleading advertisements, PITs mouthpieces have set the stage for its demented dream to go down in flames.

Value for money. PIT can buy mouthpieces, but it apparently can’t buy brains.

Homeland Security: Protecting Industry from Democracy

•June 8, 2013 • Leave a Comment

As Adam Federman reports, spying on American citizens by US intelligence and law enforcement agencies and private security companies is designed to protect industry from democracy. By gathering information and distributing bulletins about environmentally concerned citizens to local and state police, industry and public relations firms, these spies create an infrastructure that ACLU spokesman Mike German — an FBI special agent for 16 years — says is used to cripple political opposition.


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